Honors Program

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The Concord University Honors Program provides students with records of high academic achievement the opportunity to enrich their educational experience through independent artistic development, professional research, and/or community service, in order to better prepare for graduate school and professional careers in an increasingly competitive, global economy. Students earn Honors credit by participating in interdisciplinary Honors seminars or working on independent honors project under the guidance of CU faculty. Each semester, Honors students participate in academic, cultural, social and service-oriented enrichment activities. The Honors Program provides high-achieving students with a community of like-minded students and faculty.

Benefits of participation in the Honors Program include:
  • Access to the Honors Study Lounge
  • Early course registrations
  • Travel opportunities
  • Honors Course substitution in the General Education Program
  • Become part of the community of student scholars
Honors Program Director
 Tracy L. Luff, Ph.D.
 Professor of Sociology
 304-384-5242
 email

Honors Program Application

Entrance Requirements

Program Requirements

Recent Projects


 

Honors Program Entrance Requirements

For incoming Freshmen:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.50 (4.0 scale)
  • Minimum ACT score or 26
  • Minimum SAT Math & Critical Reading composite score (old) of 1170 or 1240 (new)

For transfer students and students currently enrolled at Concord University:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.50 (4.0 scale)

Note: Students who have earned more than 78 credit hours toward graduation from Concord University are NOT eligible for the Honors Program


Successful completion of the Honors Program entails the following:

  1. Entrance Requirements.
    • Students must complete an application for admission to the Honors Program.
    • Incoming students are eligible for admission if they have earned a minimum grade point average of a 3.50 (on a 4.00 scale), and a 26 on the ACT composite test or an 1170(old)/1240(new) on the SAT Critical Reading and Mathematics tests. Transfer students and students currently enrolled at Concord must have earned a minimum grade point average of 3.50 (on a 4.00 scale). Students who have earned more than 78 hours of credit toward graduation from Concord are not eligible for the Honors Program.
  2. Academic Requirements. The Honors Program requires the successful completion of 18(-21) credit hours of Honors Courses, with a minimum grade of a minimum GPA of 3.3 (on a 4.0 scale), for all coursework at Concord. The Honors Course requirements include:
    • HON 101-Introduction to the Liberal Arts and Sciences (3 hours)
    • Honors Designated Courses (12 hours) Consist of three options: (i) Honors Enhanced Courses, (ii) Honors Sections of regular course offerings and (iii) Honors Seminars. Students may take courses from one, two or all three options to fulfill this portion of the requirement. Students may also take an Honors Designated Courses at any level, 100, 200, 300 or 400, in any academic discipline for which they qualify. Students must take at least 3 credit hours of Honors Designated Courses at or above the sophomore or 200-level of instruction and, in addition, at least 3 credit hours of Honors Designated Courses at or above the junior or 300-level of instruction. Some Honors Designated Courses may require prerequisites. If so, then students must meet all the prerequisites in order to register for the course.
      • Honors Enhanced Courses: An Honors Enhanced Course is a course in any academic discipline enhanced with an honors project, i.e., an artistic, research or service project, in addition to the regularly assigned coursework. The student’s grade in the course is based solely on the regularly assigned coursework. The student must receive a grade of a “B” or better on their project in order to receive Honors credit for the course. The instructor will add an “H” to the student's transcript to indicate the successful completion of the project. Students will design and implement the Honors project in consultation with the instructor on record for the course and then, with the support of the instructor on record, submit the proposal to the Director of the Honors Program for approval within one month of the first day of classes for the fall and spring semesters. The Honors Program provides the forms for approval and a set of guidelines to assist the student and faculty in the design of these projects.
      • Honors Sections of Regular Course Offerings: An Honors Section of a regular course offering incorporates an honors project i.e., an artistic, research or service project, into the course content for all students enrolled in the course. The student’s grade in the course is based on all coursework, including the Honors project. The instructor will add an “H” to the student's transcript to indicate the successful completion of the course. The Honors Program provides a set of guidelines to assist the student and faculty in the design of these sections of regular course offerings.
      • Honors Seminars: Interdisciplinary seminars are open only to students enrolled in good standing in the Honors Program. An Honors Seminar incorporates an honors project i.e., an artistic, research or service project, into the course content for all students enrolled in the course. The student’s grade in the course is based on all coursework, including the Honors project. The instructor will add an “H” to the student's transcript to indicate the successful completion of the course. The Honors Program provides a set of guidelines to assist in the design of these projects.
    • The Senior Honors Project (3-6 credit hours). Students will design and implement a senior Honors project, i.e., an artistic, research or service project, that reflects the highest standards of artistic endeavor, research or service in consultation with the instructor on record for the course and then, with the support of the instructor on record, submit the proposal to the Director of the Honors Program for approval within one month of the first day of classes for the fall and spring semesters. The Honors Program provides the forms for approval and a set of guidelines to assist the student and faculty in the design of these projects. Only 400-level courses fulfill the requirement for the Senior Honors Research Seminar. Students may take the Senior Honors Research Seminar in any academic discipline for which they qualify. Some courses that meet the requirements for the Senior Honors Research Seminar may require prerequisites. If so, then students must meet all the prerequisites in order to register for the course.The Senior Honors Project consists of three options:
      • an Honors Enhanced Course
      • an Honors Section of a Regular Course Offering
      • an Honors Seminar. (See section b above for a description of these options.)
  3. Academic Performance. After completing 30 or more hours of Concord course credit, the student must have achieved and must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher in all courses taken at Concord.
  4. Extracurricular Programs. Each Honors student is expected to be an active member of the Honors Program and the campus community. Honors students are required to attend a minimum number of University and Honors Program sponsored events each year in order to remain in good standing in the Honors Program. Students in the Honors Program must comply with the current Enrichment Point System to receive credit for their participation in extra-curricular programs. See the Honors Coordinator for more information.

Honors Program Recent Projects

Honors students can earn honors credit in courses in any academic discipline by completing an honors project in addition to regularly assigned coursework.

  • Students design and implement the Honors project in consultation with the course instructor
  • Honors projects can be artistic, research, or service-oriented

Recent honors projects 

Spring 2017

  • Rumination and Room Invasion: Characteristics of an OCD Sufferer's Mental and Social Health Habits, Dustin Anderson, supervised by Dr. Adriana Falco
  • Effects of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells, Catherine Cavender, supervised by Dr. Kim Chambers
  • Extended Requirements in Health Careers, Catherine Cavender, supervised by Dr. Kim Chambers
  • Case View and Brief, Tyler Gordon, supervised by Mr.Joshua Lawson
  • Chemistry Class Advantage Lessons, Cole Hollifield, supervised by Dr. Hong Yin
  • Perceptual Anomalies in Individuals with Schizophrenia, Hannah Johnson, supervised by Dr. Adriana Falco
  • Social Psychology Research Paper, Erin McGrady, supervised by Ms. Lori Pace
  • Gender and the Media, Hannah Seckman, supervised by Dr. Tracy Luff
  • Photography Presentation, Keirston Sutherland, supervised by Mr. Sterling Snyder
  • Graphic Design Elements and their Perception by Concord University Students, Anastasiia Vorobeva, supervised by Mr. Kevin Bennington
  • Culture and National Identity in Art of the 20th Century, Anastasiia Vorobeva, supervised by Mr. Jack Sheffler
  • Evaluation of the Concordian Readership's Preferences and Habits, Anastasiia Vorobeva, supervised by Ms. Heather Williams
  • Writing About Art -- General Principles and Rules, Anastasiia Vorobeva, supervised by Ms. Heather Williams
  • Myth and American Gods, Jeremy Wood, supervised by Dr. Michelle Gompf
  • "The Crib", Jeremy Wood, supervised by Dr. Michelle Gompf
  • Edmonia Lewis Presentation, Jeremy Wood, supervised by Dr. Amberyl Malkovich

Fall 2016

  • Breast Cancer Cell Line (MC F7) Apoptosis and the Affect of Estrogen and Fatty Acids on Cell Proliferation, Catherine Cavendar, supervised by Dr. Kim Chambers
  • Popular Elements of Graphic Design and How they are Received by Concord University Students, Anastasiia Vorobeva, supervised by Mr. Kevin Bennington
  • The Other Side of Interview Rules and Journalism Ethics: Created for Journalists' Protection, Anastasiia Vorobeva, supervised by Ms. Heather Williams
  • Explicating the Themes of "Sing Song," Caitlyn Wendt, supervised by Dr. Amberyl Malkovich
  • Tyger, Monkey and Bear, Oh My!, Jeremy Wood, supervised by Dr. Michelle Gompf

Spring 2016

  • Research on Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Effects of Omega 3 Fatty Acids, Catherine Cavender, supervised by Dr. Kim Chambers
  • Environmental Policy and Resource Scarcity in the Mena Region, Carolyn Chonoles, supervised by Dr. Sally Howard
  • A Lawyer's Guide to the Navigation of Social Media, Tyler Gordon, supervised by Mr. Anthony Bisaha
  • Management of the Attorney-Client Privilege in Prison, Tyler Gordon, supervised by Mr. Adam Wolfe
  • The Components of Reading, Allyssa Painter, supervised by Dr. Kathy Hawks
  • Independent Case Analysis, Brittany Strother, supervised by Ms. Lindsey Akers
  • An Examination of Cajun Culture, Brittany Strother, supervised by Dr. Cory Williams
  • A Quasi-Length Autobiographical Poem in the Style of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Caitlyn Wendt, supervised by Dr. Elizabeth Roth
  • Humans of CU: A blog, Miranda Woody, supervised by Ms. Lori Pace
  • Literature in Portraits, Miranda Woody, supervised by Dr. Michelle Gompf

Fall 2015

  • Anti-Cancer Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Catherine Cavender, supervised by Dr. Kim Chambers
  • Measuring the Flow of Atmospheric Muons, Tori Miller, supervised by Dr. Alice Hawthorne-Allen
  • Weighted Theory Research, Allyssa Painter, supervised by Dr. Kathy Tucker
  • 31 Fundraiser: A Service Project, Allyssa Painter, supervised by Dr. Kathy Tucker
  • Zero to Hero: How the Ideal Cultures of Time Impact Culture, Miranda Woody, supervised by Mr. Scott McClanahan