Degrees & Course Descriptions

Online Academic Catalog                                       Department  of Humanities Catalog 

Majors

Minors

Language Courses

 

Course Descriptions

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Current English (ENGL) Course Descriptions

ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 90 or equivalent proficiency.

Exploration of the writing process, with emphasis on development of expository writing skills. Grade of C or better required to pass. (F, S)

ENGL 101C Grammar, Composition, and Rhetoric (3) Prerequisite: Less than 18 on ACT English or equivalent placement exam. 

Exploration of the writing process, with emphasis on development of expository writing skills. Through a combination of regular classwork and an individualized program of work in the writing lab and/or supplemental group work in ENGL 101L, students will, by semester’s end, cover all that is required to progress to ENGL 102.

ENGL 101L Grammar, Composition, and Rhetoric Lab (0) 

Students enrolled in ENGL 101L will address their individual writing needs through an instructor-directed series of assignments in the writing lab and/or classroom setting. Must be taken concurrently with ENGL 101C.  

ENGL 102 Composition and Rhetoric II. (3) Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 101 or equivalent proficiency.

Further exploration of the writing process and refinement of skills developed in English 101. Emphasis on the more specialized forms of writing, including argumentative and research-based writing and writing about literature. Grade of C or better required to pass. (F, S)

ENGL 203 World Literature I. (3) Prerequisite: C or higher in ENGL 102 or equivalent proficiency.

Literary masterpieces of western and non-western civilizations up to approximately 1650 (through European Renaissance), with emphasis on critical analysis, discussion, and writing about various genres, including drama, poetry, and narrative. Selective use of non-print media complements primary

focus on close reading of printed texts. (F, S)

ENGL 204 World Literature II. (3) Prerequisite: C or higher in ENGL 102 or equivalent proficiency.

A sampling of works representing western and non-western civilizations from approximately 1650 (European Neoclassical period) to the present, with emphasis on critical analysis, discussion, and writing about various genres, including drama, poetry, and narrative. Selected authors include women writers and writers representing historically marginalized ethnic groups including authors of color. Selective use of non-print media complements primary focus on close reading of printed texts. (F, S)

ENGL 205 Writing About Literature. (3) Prerequisite: C or higher in ENGL 102 or demonstration of equivalent proficiency.

A writing course for English majors that incorporates modern literature of various genres. Grade of C or better required for English program admission. ENGL 205 or demonstrated equivalent proficiency is the prerequisite for all courses for the English major, minor, or teaching content specialization (except for ENGL 251, 331; and journalism courses). (F, S)

Note: An asterisk (*) following a course title listed below indicates that ENGL 205 or instructor consent is the prerequisite for that course. Obtaining consent to enroll in any course prior to completion of ENGL 205 does not mean that the ENGL 205 requirement has been waived for students pursuing a major, minor, or teaching content specialization in English.

ENGL 251 Technical Writing. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 102; and junior or senior status or consent of instructor.

The study and application of the special techniques involved in the composition of professional letters, proposals, and reports. Course includes word processing. (F)

ENGL 261 Creative Writing.*(3)

An introduction to writing poetry, drama, and fiction.

ENGL 300 English Grammars.* (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 302 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to structural, transformational, and traditional grammars of English. (S)

ENGL 302 Study of the English Language.* (3)

Introduction to the study of phonology, morphology, and syntax of English and the forces, past and present, affecting the language. Promotes awareness of historical and cultural roots of various language patterns. (F)

ENGL 308 Advanced Composition.* (3) This course should be taken prior to the senior year. Advanced study and practice of the techniques of expository, argumentative, descriptive, and narrative writing. (S)

ENGL 310 The Teaching of Reading.* (3)

Study of the techniques of beginning and developmental reading in grades 5-Adult. Emphasis on adopting a teacher/researcher model of teaching; on developing instructional strategies to enhance reading comprehension by integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills; and on learning effective ways to communicate respect for learners from all backgrounds and at all developmental levels. (S)

ENGL 324-325-326-327, 328* (See titles below)

These five survey courses are the literary core for students taking a major, minor (except Writing-Journalism Emphasis), or a 5-Adult teaching field in English.

ENGL 324 Survey of British Literature I.* (3)

The Anglo-Saxon Period to Restoration. (F)

ENGL 325 Survey of British Literature II.* (3)

From Restoration Through Romantic.(F)

ENGL 326 Survey of British Literature III.* (3)

From Victorian to Present. (S)

ENGL 327 Survey of American Literature I.* (3)

From Beginning to Civil War. (F)

ENGL 328 Survey of American Literature II.* (3)

From Civil War to Present. (S)

ENGL 329 Children’s Literature. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 203 or consent of instructor.

A survey of both traditional and modern juvenile literature. Satisfies requirement for the K-6 certification. Selected authors include women writers and writers representing historically underrepresented ethnic groups including authors of color. Selective use of non-print media complements primary focus on printed texts, illustrations, and elements of book design. (F, S)

ENGL 330 Young Adult Literature. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 203 or 204, or consent of instructor.

A survey of literature that appeals to adolescents with emphasis on effective teaching applications. Selected authors include women writers and writers representing historically marginalized ethnic traditions, including authors of color. Selective use of non-print media complements primary focus on printed texts, illustrations, and elements of book design. (F)

ENGL 361 Advanced Creative Writing (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 261

Advanced studies in poetry, drama, fiction and/or creative non-fiction toward publication in students’ chosen field of writing.  

ENGL 413A English Language Arts Professional Seminar. (1) Prerequisites: Admission to Professional Education program; admission to B.S. English Language Arts program; EDUC 306; SPED 309, 310; ENGL 203, 204, 205 (with a grade of C or better), 300, 302, 310, 330. Or instructor consent. Highly recommended: ENGL 329A; Advanced Mini-Courses (ENGL 431A-440A) representing the following categories: female authors, authors of historically marginalized ethnic groups, such as authors of color.

Advanced educational research course for B.S. Education English Language Arts 5-9 and 5-Adult degree candidates. Teaching applications include multicultural approaches and mediaenriched, technology-supported ELA instruction and assessment that incorporates differentiation and adaptation strategies to meet a wide variety of learner needs. Self-critique of media site presentations focuses on modeling effective communication skills. Teacher candidates explore avenues for ongoing professional growth as teacher-researchers, including active membership in ELA professional organizations and subscribing to academic journals. A prerequisite for ENGL 414/415. (S)

ENGL 414 Special Methods in the Teaching of English Language Arts. (3) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of methods and materials for teaching English language arts in grades 5-Adult. Emphasis on adopting a teacher/researcher model of teaching, on developing instructional strategies for facilitating integration of the language arts, and on learning effective ways to communicate respect for learners from all backgrounds and at all developmental levels. Students who anticipate student teaching in the Fall should take 414 the preceding Fall. Grade of C or better required to pass. (F)

ENGL 415 Practicum in the Teaching of English Language Arts. (1) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Supervised experience teaching fundamentals of reading, composition, and effective language usage. Emphasis on implementing a teacher/researcher model of teaching, on facilitating integration of the language arts, and on effectively communicating respect for learners from all backgrounds and at all developmental levels. (F)

ENGL 440 Independent Study. (1, 2, 3) Prerequisites: A 2.5 average; ENGL 203, 204, or 205; consent of the instructor.

Typically, the course will be an in-depth study of a subject (mutually agreed upon by the student and the instructor) not normally treated in other courses. Applications may be picked up from the Department Chairperson. (F, S)

ENGL 461 Creative Writing Porfolio (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 261 and ENGL 361

Independent Study capstone of the Creative Writing Program. The student will prepare a collection of original work within a single genre, substantial enough to serve as a portfolio for application to an MFA program. 

ENGL 480-481 Honors Courses. (3, 3)

Juniors and seniors who qualify for Honors Courses are offered the opportunity to study with individual members of Faculty. This is specialized study apart from conventional class-room work. Interested students should contact the Department Chairperson for further information. (F, S)

Mini-Courses

  • ENGL 2201; 2202; 2203. (1, 1, 1)

Prerequisite: C or higher in ENGL 102 or equivalent proficiency. Individual one-hour courses open to both English majors and non-majors. In some cases, these courses may be used toward fulfillment of General Studies requirements.

  • ENGL 2611: Creative Writing: Poetry. (1)
  • ENGL 2612: Creative Writing: Drama. (1)
  • ENGL 2613: Creative Writing: Fiction (1) 
  • ENGL 2614: Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (1)
  • ENGL 2615: Creative Writing: Distinct Genre or Practice (1)

Intermediate-level, genre-specific creative writing courses offered as needed to accommodate students who have demonstrated strong creative writing skills in ENGL 261 or through submission of a promising creative-writing portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENGL 261 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4200-4209 Advanced Mini-Courses. Prerequisites for ENGL 4201 through ENGL 4209: ENGL 205 with a grade of C or better; and one of the following: ENGL 324, 325, 326, 327, or 328; or consent of the instructor. Prerequisites for ENGL 4200: Junior of senior status; ENGL 205 with a grade of C or better (or demonstration of comparable writing skills); one of the following: ENGL 324, ENGL 325, ENGL 326, ENGL 327, or ENGL 328 (or demonstration of comparable reading skills); and consent of the instructor.

Individual one-hour courses designed primarily for students pursuing a major, minor, or teaching content specialization in English, but may be appropriate for upper-level students in other disciplines as well. These mini-courses typically focus on major authors, genres, themes, or literary movements, or other selected aspects of the following categories:

  • ENGL 4200 Advanced Individual Research Project. (1)
  • ENGL 4201 British Literature prior to the Restoration. (1)
  • ENGL 4202 British Literature from the Restoration through the Romantics. (1)
  • ENGL 4203 British Literature from Victorian to the Present. (1)
  • ENGL 4204 American Literature from the Beginnings to the Civil War. (1)
  • ENGL 4205 American Literature from the Civil War to the Present. (1)
  • ENGL 4206 Anglophone Literature. (1)
  • ENGL 4207 Literature in English Translation. (1)
  • ENGL 4208 Advanced Special Topics. (1)
  • ENGL 4209 Linguistics; Literary Theory and Criticism; Research Methods. (1)

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Current Journalism (JOUR) Course Descriptions

JOUR 220 News Reporting I. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

An introductory survey of journalism with application in a classroom laboratory of the techniques of news gathering, news writing and editing, and the ethics and responsibilities of a reporter. (F)

JOUR 221 News Reporting II. (3) Prerequisite: ENGL 102, JOUR 220.

A continuation of news writing with an emphasis on advanced stories. (S)

JOUR 330 Copy Editing and Design. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 102, JOUR 220-221 or consent of instructor.

The principles and techniques of editing and improving copy, writing headlines, and producing attractive page makeup and display of copy. (F)

JOUR 334 Feature Writing. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 102, JOUR 220-221 or consent of instructor.

Principles and techniques of feature writing with extensive study in interpretive reporting, critical analysis. (S)

JOUR 340 Public Relations. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and CART 101.

An introductory survey of the principles and techniques of communication between an organization and its internal and external publics.

JOUR 350A-D Journalism Practicum. (1-4) Prerequisites: ENGL 102, JOUR 220- 221, and consent of instructor.

May be repeated for a maximum of four hours. Provides on-campus and/or off-campus experience in handling communication assignments. Supervised by a journalism instructor. Portfolio requirement. Contracts to be drawn up at outset of course. Credit will be on a pass/fail basis. (F, S)

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 Current History (HIST) Course Descriptions

HIST 101 History of Civilization. (3)

A survey of civilizations from their origins to modern times. HIST 101 concludes around 1600. (F)

HIST 102 History of Civilization. (3)

A survey of civilizations from their origins to modern times. HIST 102 concludes in the present day. (S)

HIST 201 History of Europe. (3)

A survey of modern European civilization from the Renaissance to 1914. (F)

HIST 203 History of the United States. (3) 

A survey of the growth of the American people from the founding of the English colonies in North America to the present. HIST 203 concludes in 1877. (F)

HIST 204 History of the United States. (3)

A survey of the growth of the American people from the founding of the English colonies in North America to the present.  (S)

HIST 300 History of the U.S. South. (3)

A study of the American South from colonial times to the present. Topics include the development of Southern identity, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the New South, Jim Crowism, the African-American experience, and the “Southernization” of American culture since the 1970s.

HIST 303 The Middle Ages. (3)

Major political, social, religious, and cultural developments of Medieval Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic States from the time of the Emperor Constantine until the capture of Constantinople by the Ottoman Turks in 1453.

HIST 305 American Colonies. (3)

This course focuses on the diverse experience of colonies in North and South America and the Caribbean during the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries. It considers the global interaction that shaped these colonies, and the interaction of colonists and native peoples, and the social and political consequences of the drive to exploit the colonies’ natural resources.

HIST 307 West Virginia History, Geography, and Government. (3)

A study of the geography, history, and government of West Virginia from the days of early settlement to the present. Special attention is given to current problems. (F,S)

Also listed as: POSC 307 

HIST 309 Ancient History. (3)

Examination of the major political, social, intellectual, and cultural developments of the western ancient world, focusing on the Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans.

HIST 310 The United States Since 1933. (3)

An examination of historical events and cultural processes in the United States, beginning with the New Deal. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of popular culture and ideas, the rise and fall of a “consensus society” in the fifties and sixties, the American global agenda after 1945, and economic and technological growth and management.

HIST 311 America in the Age of Jefferson and Jackson. (3)

A detailed study of the dramatic changes in the American economy, politics and society from 1789 to 1840. Specialized topics include the rise of the market economy, the transportation revolution, removal of the American Indian, slave insurrections and reform movements.

HIST 312 Era of the American Civil War. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 203, HIST 204, or permission of instructor.

A study of the turbulent history of the United States from the rise of the abolitionist movement and Nat Turner’s raid in 1831 to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Prominent themes include the role of slavery in the war’s origin, the wartime experience of civilians and soldiers, and the postwar struggle for power among various segments of American society.

HIST 314 History of England. (3)

A survey of British history from 1485 to the present, concentrating on the influence of Great Britain on the political and cultural development of the western world.

HIST 316 History of the Russias. (3)

This course covers Russian history and culture from Ivan the 3rd through post-Soviet Russia. Topics will include: the development of the Russian state, important movements in Russian culture, the causes and consequences of the revolutionary movement, and post-revolutionary Russia.

HIST 318 Contemporary World History. (3)

A survey of world history since 1914. The emphasis is  on the world since 1945. (S)

HIST 320 Special Topics.

HIST 321 History and Philosophy of Science. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101 or PHIL 102 or consent of the instructor. 

A critical examination of the history and philosophy of the sciences and their methods. Topics include scientific revolutions, the unity of the sciences, and the nature of experimentation, explanation, and evidence.

Also listed as: PHIL 321

HIST 322 The Enlightenment and Revolution. (3)

The course covers the European revolutions-intellectual, social, political, economic, and military-arising from the ferment of change during the Enlightenment, the French, Russian and American Revolutions, the Napoleonic Era, and the Industrial Revolution.

Also listed as: PHIL 322

HIST 326 Era of the American Revolution. (3)

Examines the origins of America’s war for independence, its legacy, and its social, political, and military aspects, from 1763 to 1830. Emphasizes the social and cultural transformation of American life, the political ideology of the revolutionaries, and the creation of the American republic. All of these themes will be explored from the perspective of soldiers, civilians, women, loyalists, African-Americans, and Indians.

HIST 328 America as Era of Reform. (3)

The history of the United States from 1876 to 1932. This course will cover the development of a new social and political order in response to industrialization, urbanization, and the integration of national and international economic systems. Emphasis is placed on changing demographics, alternative political ideologies such as progressivism and socialism, the rise of professionalism and consumerism, America as a world power, and challenges to the prevailing view of modernism and progress.

HIST 329 American Foreign Relations. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101, HIST 102, or HIST 203, HIST 204; or permission of the instructor. 

A survey of the basic themes of American foreign policy. Emphasis is placed on the cultural perspectives and behavioral dynamics in foreign policy, and how these characteristics helped to shape contact and conflict with other nations or cultures. A secondary emphasis is placed on the influence of international events on domestic conditions in the United States.

HIST 331 Asian Philosophy. (3)

A historical and critical examination of the philosophical traditions of India, China, Japan, and other Asian cultures. The course will focus on the development of the classical systems of Asian philosophy and the interaction with the philosophies of other cultures.

Also listed as: PHIL 331

HIST 333 The African-American Freedom Struggle. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 203, HIST 204; or permission of the instructor.

Places the Civil Rights movement of the 1960’s into the broader context of the African-American struggle to achieve freedom from the conclusion of the Civil War to the present, and considers the struggle in the broader context of other libertarian movements and global events.

HIST 335 Ancient East Asia. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101, HIST 102, or HIST 203, HIST 204; or permission of the instructor.

This course will cover the development of East Asian civilizations from the Neolithic era to the establishment of a permanent western presence in the 1600s. Topics include the creation of social, economic, and political institutions; unification of the suzerain empire; development of Confucian traditions; the rise of Taoism, Buddhism, and Shintoism; the late imperial order in China; and the character of Japanese feudalism.

HIST 351 Renaissance, Reformation, and the Modern State. (3)

Against the backdrop of religious wars, the creation of the nation-state, the development of colonial empires, and social and economic crises, this course examines Early Modern Europe as a period of transition between medieval and modern Europe.  

HIST 361 The American West. (3)

The frontier experience in U.S. history, with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course will explore the images of the American West in literature, film, and commentary, and compare the frontier with those of Canada and Mexico. The role of the West in the evolution of nationalist ideologies and cultural attitudes will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on Native American and Hispanic borderland cultures.

HIST 375 History of World Religions. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101 or permission of the instructor. 

This course explores the historical development of the world’s religious traditions with particular attention to their philosophical, theological, and ritual dimensions, as well as their relationship with one another. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, or the history with an emphasis in philosophy track.

Also listed as: PHIL 375

HIST 390 Feminism and Gender in Modern History. (3) 

This course examines the history of feminist though and philosophy within the historical experience of women utilizing a critical framework for the analysis of the creation and enforcement of the concepts of gender. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, or the history with an emphasis in philosophy track.

Also listed as: PHIL 390

HIST 399 Utopian Studies. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101, HIST 102 or PHIL 101, PHIL 102; or permission of instructor. 

This course examines attempts in East Asia and the West to imagine and create “more perfect” societies based on various philosophical, religious, and political paradigms, from the ancient world to the present day. Studies are not limited to utopian ideals; dystopian concepts and societies are also examined. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, or the history with an emphasis in philosophy track.

Also listed as: PHIL 399

HIST 412 Slavery in the Atlantic World. (3)

This course considers the various manifestations of slavery in the Western hemisphere during the 17th, 18th, and 19th century. Focuses on the nature of slavery, forms of resistance, cultural exchange, and the process of emancipation. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, including the capstone thesis requirement. Students taking this course for the capstone must be a junior or senior, must have competed at least two upper level courses in history, and must inform the instructor of their decision at the beginning of the course.

HIST 414 American Cultures. (3)

An advanced survey of the cultural matrices of the United States through its history, as defined by gender, race, ethnicity, religion, creed, socio-economic class, condition, and other factors. Among the issues covered will be identity, assimilation and autonomy, pluralism, the effects of cultural diversity on the American global perspective, institutional elasticity and tolerance, and the creation of national ideologies. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, including the capstone thesis requirement. Students taking this course for the capstone must be a junior or senior, must have completed at least two upper level courses in history, and must inform the instructor of their decision at the beginning of the course.

HIST 412 European Social History, 1400-1900. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101, HIST 102 or permission of instructor. 

This course begins with the Renaissance, examining changes in social definitions and structures in Europe brought about by intellectual and political revolutions, major changes in economic systems, and growing contact with the non-western world. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, including the capstone thesis requirement. Students taking this course for the capstone must be a junior or senior, must have completed at least two upper level courses in history, and must inform the instructor of their decision at the beginning of the course.

Note: To be taken in the 1st year of the Legal Studies Program or the 3rd year of Business program.

HIST 418 Modern East Asia. (3)

The modern transformation of East Asian societies over the last several centuries, with a focus on China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. The course will cover the features of traditional civilizations, the impact of Western imperialism, attempts to modernize and create industrial economies, the formation of commercial and professional classes, and the rise of nationalism. Comparative characteristics of East Asian and Western societies will be discussed. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, including thesis requirement. Students taking this course for the capstone must be a junior or senior, must have completed at least two upper level courses in history, and must inform the instructor of their decision at the beginning of the course.

HIST 430 Seminar. 

HIST 440 Independent Study.

HIST 480 Honors Courses.

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 Current Philosophy (PHIL) Course Descriptions

PHIL 101 History of Philosophy I. (3)

Examines the history of philosophical though, and emphasizes developments in ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics ,political philosophy, and religion.

PHIL 102 History of Philosophy II. (3)

Examines the history of philosophical though, and emphasizes developments in ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, political philosophy, and religion.

PHIL 210 Logic. (3)

Examines the conditions for proper, clear, and effective reasoning. While the focus will be on identifying and evaluating arguments in everyday and academic discourse, the course will also include the study of formal philosophical logic.

PHIL 310 Epistemology. (3)

A critical examination of the nature of knowledge, that is, the nature of our right to the beliefs which we possess, as well as the possibility, the basis, and the scope of knowledge.

PHIL 312 Metaphysics. (3)

A critical examination of the nature of reality and existence, including the nature of time, space, being, and other fundamental categories, as well as the existence and nature of God and the problem of evil.

PHIL 314 Aesthetics. (3)

Explores the traditional and contemporary approaches to the study of the arts and their relationship with particular values, including truth, goodness, and beauty.

PHIL 316 Ethics. (3)

A systematic analysis of the principles that guide human conduct. Topics include: nature and purpose of ethics; relativism and objectivism; the nature of values; utilitarian, deontological, and virtue ethics; the relationship between ethics and religion; and current discussions within the field today.

PHIL 320 Special Topics.

PHIL 321 History and Philosophy of Science. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101 or PHIL 102 or consent of the instructor. 

A critical examination of the history and philosophy of the sciences and their methods. Topics include scientific revolutions, the unity of the sciences, and the nature of experimentation, explanation, and evidence.

Also listed as: HIST 321

PHIL 322 The Enlightenment and Revolution. (3)

The course covers the European revolutions-intellectual, social, political, economic, and military-arising from the ferment of change during the Enlightenment, the French, Russian and American Revolutions, the Napoleonic Era, and the Industrial Revolution.

Also listed as: HIST 322

PHIL 331 Asian Philosophy. (3)

A historical and critical examination of the philosophical traditions of India, China, Japan, and other Asian cultures. The course will focus on the development of the classical systems of Asian philosophy and the interaction with the philosophies of other cultures.

Also listed as: HIST 331

PHIL 351 Contemporary Philosophy. (3)

Focuses on trends in the twentieth and twenty-first century philosophy, including existentialism, post-modernism, and feminism

PHIL 361 Biomedical Ethics. (3)

This course explores debates on current issues in the field of biomedical ethics including abortion, assisted reproduction, genetic engineering, euthanasia, resource allocation, human and non-human animal experimentation, confidentiality, consent, and public policy. Students will read a series of articles on a particular issue each week of the semester, summarize the arguments in the debate, and then formulate their own conclusions.

PHIL 375 History of World Religions. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101 or permission of the instructor. 

This course explores the historical development of the world’s religious traditions with particular attention to their philosophical, theological, and ritual dimensions, as well as their relationship with one another. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, or the history with an emphasis in philosophy track.

Also listed as: HIST 375

PHIL 390 Feminism and Gender in Modern History. (3)

This course examines the history of feminist though and philosophy within the historical experience of women utilizing a critical framework for the analysis of the creation and enforcement of the concepts of gender. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, or the history with an emphasis in philosophy track.

Also listed as: HIST 390

PHIL 399 Utopian Studies. (3) Prerequisites: HIST 101, HIST 102 or PHIL 101, PHIL 102; or permission of instructor. 

This course examines attempts in East Asia and the West to imagine and create “more perfect” societies based on various philosophical, religious, and political paradigms, from the ancient world to the present day. Studies are not limited to utopian ideals; dystopian concepts and societies are also examined. May be taken to fulfill program requirements for the history track, or the history with an emphasis in philosophy track.

Also listed as: HIST 399

PHIL 430 Seminar.

PHIL 440 Independent Study.

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 Current Language (FREN, GERM, SPAN) Course Descriptions

FREN 101 Elementary French I. (3)

The most basic patterns of French grammar. Basic vocabulary and development of beginning skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending the French language. Emphasis on the present tense. (F)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level French course may not receive credit for this course.

FREN 102 Elementary French II. (3)

Further development of elementary skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending. Expansion of tenses, moods, and sentence complexity. (S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level French course may not receive credit for this course.

FREN 201 Intermediate French I. (3) Prerequisites: FREN 101-FREN 102 or equivalent, two years of high school French, or consent of instructor. 

Readings in Francophone cultures and literature; review and expansion of French grammar and vocabulary; practice in writing, speaking, and comprehending the language. (F)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level French course may not receive credit for this course.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II. (3) Prerequisites: FREN 101-FREN 102 or equivalent, or three years of high school French, or consent of instructor. 

Further readings in Francophone cultures and literature; review and enhancement of French grammar and vocabulary; practice in writing, speaking, and comprehending the language. (S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level French course may not receive credit for this course.

GERM 101 Elementary German I. (3)

The basic patterns of German grammar. Emphasis on basic vocabulary and on developing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending the German language. (F)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level German course may not receive credit for this course.

GERM 102 Elementary German II. (3) Prerequisites: GERM 101 or one year of high school German, or consent of instructor. 

Further development of skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending. (S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level German course may not receive credit for this course.

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I. (3)

The most basic patterns of Spanish grammar. Emphasis on bas vocabulary and on developing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending the Spanish language. Emphasis on the present tense. (F, S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level Spanish course (except SPAN 210) may not receive credit for this course.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II. (3) Prerequisites: SPAN 101 or one year of high school Spanish, or consent of instructor. 

Further development of skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending. Expansion of tenses, moods, and sentence complexity. (F, S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level Spanish course (except SPAN 210) may not receive credit for this course.

SPAN 110 Advanced Beginning Spanish. (4)

Students with some High School Spanish but who are not ready for SPAN 102 start at a higher level than SPAN 101. The course catches up with SPAN 102 so that students completing it may enter SPAN 201. (F, S)

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I. (3) Prerequisites: SPAN 101-SPAN 102 or equivalent, or two years of hgh school Spanish, or consent of instructor. 

Readings in Hispanic cultures and literature; review and expansion of Spanish grammar and vocabulary; practice in writing, speaking, and comprehending the language. (F,S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level Spanish course (except SPAN 210) may not receive credit for this course.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II. (3) Prerequisities: SPAN 101-SPAN 102 and SPAN 201 or equivalent, or three years of high school Spanish, or consent of instructor.

Further readings in Hispanic cultures and literature; review and enhancement of Spanish grammar and vocabulary; practice in writing, speaking, and comprehending the language. This course will give students the essential grammatical and cultural tools necessary to express themselves in upper level classes. (F,S)

Note: Students who have received credit for any higher-level Spanish course (except SPAN 210) may not receive credit for this course.

SPAN 210 Culture and Civilization of the Hispanic World. (3) 

This class will introduce students to a wide range of themes that surround the Hispanic World, such as “empire”, “discovery”, “identity”, and “difference” in order to expand knowledge of important issues surrounding the peoples of Spain, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. Taught in English.

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