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Academics > College of Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences > Department of Humanities > English

English

The B.A. English Program offers students a choice of 3 different tracks, as well as 2 minors and course work for the B.S. English Education major. The core of all of these is the same, with the focus on a solid foundation in literary history and study. 

B.A. English - Creative Writing Emphasis 
The Creative Writing Emphasis of the B.A. English Program provides students with not only a variety of classes and workshops on creative writing of various generes, but also a solid basis in literature and English language and linguistics classes. The exposure to various periods and types of literature provides students with a variety of examples and knowledge to build upon in their own writing. Language and linguistics classes help students understandthe tools with which they create. The Creative Writing Portfolio will arm students with a sample of their work which they can use when contacting publishers or applying to M.F.A programs. In addition to M.F.A. programs, this degree can also prepare students for graduate work in other fields, such as publishing, editing, and writing. Regardless of career path chosen, through reading works of literature students will be able to better understand how literature both reflects and comments on society and humanity, enabling them to better understand their world. The reading and writing required in this major will also prepare students to be close and critical readers of their world, as well as effective communicators. 

B.A. English - Literature Emphasis 
The Literature Emphasis of the B.A. English Program provides students with a broad scope of knowledge in the survey classes and a deep dive into particular subjects in the seminars, preparing them for graduate work in fields such as literature, composition, English education, communication, journalism, library science, and linguistics; or for a career in various fields such as publishing, editing, marketing, broadcasting/journalism, or writing. This degree program further serves as an appropriate pre-professional major for a student who plans to seek a higher degree in a field such as law, medicine, ministry, or mental health, especially when combined with a second major or minor pertinent to that field (for example, history, politial science, business, biology, philosophy , psychology, etc.). Regardless of career path chosen, through reading works of literature students will be able to better understand how literature both reflects and comments on society and humanity, enabling them to better understand their world. The reading and writing required in this major will also prepare students to be close and critical readers of their world, as well as effective communicators. 

B.A. English - Professional Writing Emphasis
The Professional Writing Emphasis of the B.A. English Program provides students with a solid background in the study of literature, along with clases in various forms of writing and in the English language and linguistics. Students in this emphasis not only take a creative writing class, but also technical writing and journalism, thus broadening their experience and practice. The exposure to various periods and types of literature provides students with a variety of examples and knowledge to build upon in their own writing. Language and linguistics classes help students understand the tools with which they create. The degree program prepares students for graduate study in fields such as literature, composition, communication, or journalism. This degree also prepares students for careers in technical writing, journalism, publishing, and editing. Regardless of career path chosen, through reading works of literature students will be able to better understand how literature both reflects and comments on society and humanity, enabling them to better understand their world. The reading and writing required in this major will also prepare students to be close and critical readers of their world, as well as effective communicators. 

English - Literature (minor) 
The literature minor in English supports a large number of majors in a variety of disciplines. It is, for example, a good supplement to history, the arts, and many of the social sciences. 

English - Writing (minor) 
The writing minor in English supports a large number of majors in a variety of disciplines. It is, for example, a good supplement to not only history and the arts, but also both the natural and social sciences, as well as business. 

English - B.S. Education, English Grade 5 - Adult Teaching Concentration (major)

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Education in English requires successful completion of at least 120 semester hours, including (1) the General Education Program, including ENGL 203 and ENGL 204; (2) the Professional Education Component, and (3) the requirements associated with English 5-Adult.

This degree qualifies graduates for certification to teach English at both the middle-school and high-school level. To increase job opportunities, an additional teaching content specialization is recommended. 

The English course requirements for the B.S. Education, English 5 - Adult degree overlaps those for the B.A. English - Literature Emphasis degree so substantially that with careful planning, both degrees can be earned simultaneiously within four years.
 


 
Assessments

 English Program Assessments
English Program assessment data is collected at program-entry and program-exit levels:

  • Program Entry Assessments:
    • Qualifying Writing Assessment
    • Diagnostic Linguistic and Literary Knowledge and Skills Exam (LLKSE)
  • Program Exit Assessments:
    • Capstone Writing Assessment
    • Capstone Linguistic and Literary Knowledge and Skills Exam (LLKSE)

For information about English Program writing assessments, please contact Dr. Elizabeth Roth.
For information about the LLKSE assessments, please contact Dr. Michelle Gompf.
 

 

Mini Courses

One-hour courses are designed to focus on major authors, genres, themes, or literary movements. They allow for focused intense study, often in the specific research area of the instructor. Courses focused on literary topics are offered at both the 400-level, for English majors and other advanced students, and at the 200-level for all students. Creative Writing 200-level mini courses are also offered that focus on writing in specific genres. 

Three of the 200-level literary based mini-courses (numbered ENGL 224 and ENGL 225) may be substituted for English 204 or 204 for the General Education Program requirements. 

Two or more course with identical course titles cannot be used for substitution purposes.

NOTE: Both ENGL 203 and 204 are required for B.A. English and B.S. Education in English majors and cannot be substitued. Additional mini-course requirements vary by degree and emphasis. 

Fall 2019

  • 210 - Writing in the Sciences
  • 224 - Early American Drama
  • 225 - Gothic Literature 
  • 225 - Fantasy & SciFi
  • 262 - Creative Writing: Poetry
  • 267 - Reflexes
  • 420 - History of the Book
  • 421 - Shakespeare Roman Tragedy
  • 423 - Oscar Wilde
  • 425 - African American Poetry 
     

Spring 2019

Spring 2018

Fall 2017

Spring 2017

Fall 2016

Spring 2016

Organizations

Film Society

The Film Society showcases films several times a week in Marsh Hall 237. Showings are free of charge and open to all University students and the community.

In addition to cult classics, the film society showings represent a wide range of genres and content from foreign, classic, and art films outside of the mainstream.

Check posted flyers for current show times, dates, and film information.

To sign up for emails regarding the film society and film showings, or additional information about the film society, email Dr. Gabriel Rieger at grieger@concord.edu. 

Schedule Spring 2018

Schedule Fall 2017

Schedule Spring 2017

Schedule Fall 2016

Schedule Spring 2016

Schedule Fall 2015

Schedule Spring 2015

Schedule Fall 2014

Schedule Spring 2014

Reflexes
Reflexes, Concord’s literary art magazine, is published each spring. Funded by the Student Government Association, the magazine serves as an outlet for students interested in writing and art. Open Mic sessions are also held.
Reflexes was originally founded as a literary magazine at Concord University for students to share their literary talents with others. Due to money issues and other problems, Reflexes had to be shut down. However, in the Fall of 2014, some students decided that Concord University is still filled with creative minds that need an outlet for their thoughts and designs.  

Reflexes is no longer a magazine for literature alone. Reflexes is now a magazine for the arts - all of the arts.  We believe in showcasing all art - not just conventional art.   This means that Reflexes is an extremely diverse magazine, accepting submissions from all artistic genres. Any work that appears on the Reflexes website will be screened through a submission process in which a team of dedicated Concord Students will review the work for possible publication on the site. To learn more information about this process, visit the How to Submit below.

This Reflexes is still a new project, and because of that we are still learning.  If you have any suggestions, or would like to know more about helping the magazine grow, please feel free to contact us!
Who can I contact?
Mr. Mark Botts
Instructor of English
304-384-5171
mbotts@concord.edu

If you are a member of the Concord University community and are interested in getting involved with Reflexes, please contact the student editors at reflexes@concord.edu, or our faculty advisor, Mr. Mark Botts. We are happy to accept new members and always welcome new ideas.

Archived Editions
Fall 2017- Halloween Edition 
Spring 2017 

Submission Guidelines
To maintain the quality of the publication, the staff of Reflexes retains the right to refuse any submission.
Who can submit to Reflexes?

  • Concord University Students
  • Concord University Faculty
  • Concord University Staff
  • Anyone within the commuting distance of Concord University, regardless of relationship to the university.
Types of works accepted:
  • Poetry
  • Musical works
  • Fiction and Non-fiction short stories
  • Visual Media
  • Fan-Fiction
If uncertain whether a type of work will be accepted or not, please contact us to ask.
What to include in your submission:
  • Name (optional, may submit anonymously)
  • Title of work (if applicable)
  • Short description of work
  • Dedication (optional)
  • Would you like the work to be included in sections? (only if it is a longer work)
  • Year/Major
  • About the creator
What cannot be in your submission?
  • Nothing that intentionally humiliates, harms, belittles or defames the character of a particular group or individual.
  • Explicit images, text, or lyrics with no purpose other than to be overtly sexual.
When can you submit to Reflexes?
  • For each submission date, submissions must be sent to Reflexes staff by no later than 6:00 p.m. Submissions are due on February 18 to be published on February 26, March 18 to be published on March 26, and April 22 to be published on April 30.
  • If you submit after the submission date, your work will be held until the next submission deadline.
  • All work submitted will be run through a plagiarism checker before going any further in the submission process.  If a work is found to be plagiarized, the work will be reported to the University for Academic Dishonesty and could result in disciplinary consequences at the university level. Submission of plagiarized work may also result in a ban on submitting to Reflexes.
  • All written work needs to either be typed (preferred) or legibly written if a hard copy is being submitted. 
  • Any material that shows students, faculty, or staff in a compromising manner will be reported to the authorities.
What Happens to Submissions From There?
  1. Submissions will be collected by the (co)editor(s) who will remove any identifying information if possible.
  2. Members will blind review works individually and then discuss as a group. 
  3. Things that will be taken into consideration:
    Grammar
    Spelling
    Quality 
    Uniqueness 
    Originality 
    Appropriateness
  4. Submissions will be put to a vote, needing 2/3 majority to be accepted.  If there is a tie, the faculty advisor will be the tiebreaker.
  5. Works accepted will be returned to their creator with any recommended editorial changes.
  6. Once revised, the work will be held for the next publication. 

Submit work here:  reflexes@concord.edu
 
Sigma Tau Delta
http://www.english.org/
 

External Resources for Current Students
Links to other Writing Labs and Sites for Writers

Numerous web sites are available to help you become a better writer. Some of the best include:

OWL Resources for Writers - Purdue University offers some of the best information available to improve your writing skills. You will find additional links as well as handouts, advice, practice sheets, and much more. Purdue Online Writing Lab

Topics are abundant at the University of Richmond Writer's Web. This site explores topics by the various stages of the writing process - First Draft, Focusing & Connecting Ideas, General Editing, Peer Editing, Sentence Structure, Using and Documenting Sources. You will also find hints for writing papers in other disciplines.

Need a Handbook? The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has a handbook that explains and illustrates the basic grammatical rules concerning the parts of speech, phrases, clauses, sentences and sentence elements, and common problems of usage. The Writers' Workshop site is well worth your time. Grammar Handbook

Need a Dictionary, Thesaurus or Translator?

Dictionary.com includes "Ask Doctor Dictionary", Fun & Games, Other Dictionaries (German, Greek,Latin, Spanish, etc.), Roget's Thesaurus, Translator, Web Directory, Word of the Day and Writing Resources. Dictionary

Doing A Research Paper? 

Diana Hacker, author of A Writer's Reference, supplies you with information on writing all types of research papers. You will find documentation instructions using MLA (Humanities), APA (Social Sciences), Chicago (History) and CBE (Science) styles.

The Modern Language Association is a must for students needing help on citation. MLA ONLINE
 

Programs of Studies

Undergraduate

Course Descriptions