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Master of Science in Athletic Training

Welcome! We are pleased you are interested in learning more about our Graduate Athletic Training Program (ATP) at Concord University (CU).

The primary mission of the CU Graduate ATP is to educate each of its students about the theoretical and clinical skills necessary to work effectively with the physical, physiological, psychological and biomechanical aspects of injury, illness, and performance regarding physically active individuals. Students are presented with the didactic, psychomotor, and affective experiences that will lead them to be able to exercise sound ethical judgment and critical thinking and problem solving skills in order to assist them in achieving satisfying careers and making positive contributions to their profession and communities. In addition, the ATP guides the student on the journey to become a lifelong learner through obligatory professional continuing education.

The ATP at CU is housed in the Department of Health Sciences within the College of Science, Mathematics, and Health. We are proud to offer individualized attention and boast an average size of approximately 10-15 students per class within the major requirements. We received our initial accreditation in 2004. The ATP has received back-to-back 10-year awards of continuing accreditation from the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). This is the highest level of accreditation granted which exemplifies the integrity and quality of our program.

We offer a 3+2 program design. This means students at Concord pursuing athletic training are classified as undergraduate students for their first three years and graduate students the last two years. After 5 years and upon completion of the full program students will earn a Bachelor of Science in Health Science (BSHS) and a Master of Science in Athletic Training (MSAT). Students enrolled at the undergraduate level will be Health Science majors with a Pre-Athletic Training emphasis. This track will assist students in preparing all programmatic and curricular prerequisites for entry into the Graduate ATP. During the third undergraduate year students will apply to the Graduate School and the Graduate ATP. The graduate curriculum follows a summer/fall/spring sequence. Summer courses are all online or hybrid and do not require a presence on campus until immediately before the fall semester.

Transfer students completing undergraduate degrees at other institutions may also apply to the Graduate ATP to only complete the 2-year MSAT. Transfer students must complete the same application process and equivalent curricular prerequisites for admission.

We are proud of our Mountain Lion traditions and strive to provide the best education possible. If you are interested in discovering more about our program, I encourage you to explore the information provided throughout our website. If you have any questions about the Graduate Athletic Training Program at Concord University feel free to contact our Program Director, John C. Roberts, Jr., EdD, ATC at 304-384-6346. Good luck in all your future endeavors and we hope to meet you soon!
What is an Athletic Trainer?

Athletic training encompasses the prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of emergent, acute or chronic injuries and medical conditions. Athletic training is recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA), Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as an allied health care profession. (www.NATA.org)

Athletic trainers (ATs) are highly qualified, multi-skilled health care professionals who render service or treatment, under the direction of or in collaboration with a physician, in accordance with their education, training and the state's statutes, rules and regulations. As a part of the health care team, services provided by athletic trainers include primary care, injury and illness prevention, wellness promotion and education, emergent care, examination and clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. The NATA Code of Ethics states the principles of ethical behavior that should be followed in the practice of athletic training.

ATs are sometimes confused with personal trainers. There is, however, a large difference in the education, skillset, job duties and patients of an athletic trainer and a personal trainer. The athletic training academic curriculum and clinical training follows the medical model. ATs must graduate from an accredited master’s program and pass the BOC national certification exam (http://www.bocatc.org/).

ATs treat a range of physically active patients and can work in a variety of settings. Regardless of their practice setting, athletic trainers practice according to their education, scope of practice, and state practice regulations. Examples of roles and settings where ATs may work include, but are not limited to:
  • Sports medicine staff for public and private secondary schools
  • Sports medicine staff for collegiate athletics
  • Sports medicine staff for professional or Olympic sports
  • Sports medicine staff for youth leagues at both municipal and independently owned youth sports facilities
  • Orthopedic physician clinical practice, similar to nurses, physician assistants, physical therapists and other professional clinical personnel
  • General medicine clinical practice
  • Rural and urban hospitals, hospital emergency rooms, urgent and ambulatory care centers
  • Clinics with specialties in sports medicine, cardiac rehab, medical fitness, wellness and physical therapy
  • Occupational health departments in commercial settings, which include manufacturing, distribution and offices to assist with ergonomics
  • Police and fire departments and academies
  • Branches of the military
  • Performing arts including professional and collegiate level dance and theater
Graduate ATP Mission, Goals, and Objectives

Mission

The Graduate ATP at Concord University prepares students for entry into the athletic training profession. Upon completion of the ATP, the student will be eligible to sit for the BOC Examination.

The primary mission of the Concord University Graduate ATP is to educate each of its students about the theoretical and clinical skills necessary to work effectively with the physical, physiological, psychological and biomechanical aspects of injury, illness, and performance regarding physically active individuals. Students are presented with the didactic, psychomotor, and affective experiences that will lead them to be able to exercise sound ethical judgment and critical thinking and problem solving skills in order to assist them in achieving satisfying careers and making positive contributions to their profession and communities. In addition, the ATP guides the student on the journey to become a lifelong learner through obligatory professional continuing education.

Goals & Outcomes

Student Goal 1 (Health & Wellness Promotion & Injury & Illness Prevention): Students will effectively promote healthy lifestyle behaviors with effective education and communication to enhance wellness and minimize the risk of injury and illness.
  • Outcome I:A – Demonstrate the ability to design wellness and prevention programs for physically active populations.
  • Outcome I:B – Demonstrate the ability to administer pre-participation screening for physical activity.
  • Outcome I:C – Demonstrate the ability to administer routine preventative care during daily patient interactions.
  • Outcome I:D – Demonstrate the ability to educate patients, participants, parents, general population, and appropriate personnel with the intent of preventing activity related injuries and conditions.

Student Goal 2 (Clinical Assessment, Evaluation, & Diagnosis): Students will effectively implement systematic, evidence-based examinations, and assessments to formulate valid clinical diagnoses and determine patients’ plan of care and appropriate referral.
  • Outcome II:A – Demonstrate the ability to conduct a comprehensive individual history, though observation, and relevant review of medical records.
  • Outcome II:B – Demonstrate the ability to correctly identify and diagnosis orthopedic injuries and medical conditions related to or effecting physical activity.
  • Outcome II:C – Demonstrate the ability to appropriately educate patients, and appropriate individuals, regarding clinical findings and outcome prognoses.
  • Outcome II:D – Understand how to effectively and efficiently conduct evidence-based practice (EBP) and research. Student Goal 3 (Emergency Care): Students will effectively integrate best practices in immediate and emergency care for optimal outcomes.
  • Outcome III:A – Demonstrate the ability to design and implement Emergency Action Plans.
  • Outcome III:B – Demonstrate the ability to appropriately triage and determine if conditions, injuries, and/or illness are life-threatening.
  • Outcome III:C – Demonstrate the ability to implement appropriate referral strategies for the emergency transfer of a patient.

Student Goal 4 (Therapeutic Interventions): Students will effectively rehabilitate and recondition injuries, illnesses, and general medical conditions with the goal of achieving optimal activity levels based on evidence-based core concepts using therapeutic interventions.
  • Outcome IV:A – Demonstrate the ability to appropriately develop, evaluate, and modify therapeutic care to optimize patients’ outcomes.
  • Outcome IV:B – Demonstrate the ability to appropriately and correctly administer therapeutic exercises, therapeutic modalities, and manual techniques to patients in order to optimize recovery and function.
  • Outcome IV:C – Demonstrate the ability to appropriately and correctly administer therapeutic interventions for general medical conditions or illnesses in order to optimize recovery and function.
  • Outcome IV:D – Demonstrate the ability to appropriately and correctly evaluate patients’ functional return to participation in order to optimize recovery and minimize the risk of further damage, re-injury, or re-aggravation.
  • Outcome IV:E – Demonstrate knowledge of various and appropriate equipment, and its maintenance, for the purpose of administering therapeutic exercises, therapeutic modalities, manual techniques, functional assessments, and therapeutic interventions.

Student Goal 5 (Organizational, Administrative, & Professional Responsibilities): Students will effectively integrate best practices in policy construction and implementation, documentation, basic business practices, and professionalism to promote optimal patient care and professional well-being.
  • Outcome V:A – Demonstrate the ability to develop policies, procedures, and strategies to address risks and organizational needs.
  • Outcome V:B – Demonstrate an understanding of the need to have knowledge of and practice within local, state, and national regulations, guidelines, recommendations, and professional standards.
  • Outcome V:C – Demonstrate knowledge of topics and components of all of the NATA Position Statements and Consensus Statements.
  • Outcome V:D – Demonstrate knowledge of the process for completing the BOC required continuing education requirements.

Program Goal (Programmatic Delivery, Design, & Results): The Graduate Athletic Training Program will continuously produce quality students to transition to practice as competent professionals in accordance with all professional standards, responsibilities, and guidelines set forth by the CAATE, BOC, NATA, local, state, and federal governance and within the mission of Concord University.
  • VI:A – The program will grow and maintain a number of students within the professional phase of the ATP to justify the continued offering of the athletic training major and degree at CU.
  • VI:B – The ATP will demonstrate the ability to produce competent health care professionals in athletic training.
  • VI:C – The ATP will provide an a safe and motivational learning environment for students.
Programmatic Outcomes

National CAATE standards require accredited athletic training programs to maintain a 3-year aggregate of at least a 70% pass rate for first-time BOC exam takers.
 
  2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 3-Year Aggregate
Number of students graduating from program 5 11 6 22
Number of students graduating from program who took the examination 5 11 5 21
Number of students who passed the examination in the first attempt 3 8 3 14
Percentage of students who passed the examination in the first attempt 60% 73% 60% 67%
Number of students who passed the examination regardless of the number of attempts 5 10 3 18
Percentage of students who passed the examination regardless of the number of attempts 100% 91% 60% 86%

Student Graduation Rate

Graduation rate (taken from United States Department of Education): Measures the progress of students who began their studies as full-time, first-time degree- or certificate seeking students by showing the percentage of these students who complete their degree or certificate within a 150% of "normal time" for completing the program in which they are enrolled.

Graduation rate is calculated as: the sum of students with a Graduated status divided by the total number of students in the cohort (excluding students with the status of leave of absence (medical) or deceased).
 
  2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 3-Year Aggregate
Number of students graduating from program 5 11 6 22
Student Graduation Rate 83% 85% 100% 88

Student Employment/Replacement Rate

Graduate employment/placement rate: Percentage of students within 6-months of graduation that have obtained positions in the following categories: employed as an athletic trainer, employed as other, and not employed.

Employment/Placement rate is calculated as: the sum of students with a Employed as an Athletic Trainer or Employed as an Athletic Trainer and in a degree or residency program then divided by the total number of students who have graduated (excluding students with a Not Employed, due to military service and Deceased).
 
  2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 3-Year Aggregate
Number of students employed as an AT 5 11 6 22
Student employment/
placement rate as an AT
100% 55% 20% 57%
Number of students employed as other 0 0 2 2
Students employment/
placement rate as "other"
0 0 40 10
Number of students not employed 0 0 1 6
Student not employed rate 0 45% 20% 29%


Programmatic Retention Rate
 
The CU ATP is a 2-Year Professional Phase Program 2017-18 Graduating Cohort 2018-19 Graduating Cohort 2019-20 Graduating Cohort 3-Year Aggregate (2016-17 through 2018-19)
1. Number of students applying to the ATP 12 16 9 37
2. Number of students offered initial admission into the ATP 9 16 8 33
3. Percent of students offered initial admission into the ATP (#2/#1) 75% 100% 89% 89%
4. Number of students accepting admission into & beginning the ATP 6 12 6 24
5. Percent of students accepting admission into & beginning the ATP (#4/#2) 67% 75% 75% 73%
6. Number of students returning for second & final year of ATP 5 11 6 22
7. Program retention rate (#6/#4) 83% 92% 100% 92%
Curricular Prerequisites, Application Materials, and Admissions Requirements for the Graduate ATP

Graduate ATP Curricular Prerequisites (included in the BSHS but required for all MSAT Applicants)
Course
(Transfer Students)
Credit Hrs Required Concord Equivalent
(Included in the BSHS Pre-Athletic Training Emphasis)
Biology 3-4 BIOL 101/101L: Human Body & Lab or
BIOL 121/121L: Foundations of Biology I & Lab
Human Anatomy with lab 4 BIOL 335/335L: Human Anatomy & Physiology I & Lab
Human Physiology with lab 3-4 BIOL 336/336L: Human Anatomy & Physiology II & Lab
Chemistry 3-4 Chem 101/111: General Chemistry I & Lab
Physics 3-4 PHYS 101/101L: Introctory Physics & Lab or
PHYS 201/201L: University Physics with Calculus Part I & Lab
Statistics 3 MATH 105: Elementary Statistics
Psychology 3 PSY 101: General Psychology
Exercise Physiology with lab 3-4 EXSS 314: Exercise Physiology and
EXSS 314L: Exercise Testing & Prescription
Kinesiology or Biomechanics 3 EXSS 315: Kinesiology & Biomechanics
Nutrition 2-3 HED 304: Principles of Nutrition & Weight Management
Community Health 2-3 HED 415: Community Health & Health Promotion
Epidemiology 2-3 HS 301: Public Health Epidemiology

Non-Curricular MSAT Application Requirements Checklist

(Documentation to be uploaded and submitted through ATCAS)
Requirement
Graduate School Application (completed through Concord Admissions, not ATCAS)
-$30 fee for transfer students completing only the MSAT at Concord
-No fee for students already enrolled at Concord completing the 3+2 BSHS/MSAT plan
Create ATCAS Profile (free)
-Application for first school ($85, but fee waiver is available for financial hardships)
-Applications for all subsequent schools ($50)
-Fees not paid until application is complete (to be paid to ATCAS, not Concord)
Application Form
Letter of Application
2 Letters of Recommendation:
-one from a educator
-one from a health care professional
Previous Transcripts (submitted to Concord Admissions and ATCAS):
(must include all all Curricular Prerequisites for acceptance):
-Current transcripts for at least 90 credits for students completing the 3+2 plan or
-Bachelors degree transcripts for students entering directly into the graduate program
50 hours of observation with health care professional (10 must be with an athletic trainer)
-must not be hands-on patient care
Physical
Immunization Records
PPD/TB Test
Hep B Vaccination/Declination
Professional Rescuer CPR Certification
Technical Standards
Confidentiality & Security Agreement
Communicable Disease Acknowledgement
Background Check (not tracked by ATCAS)
Interview (completed via phone, virtual, and/or face-to-face interview)

*This application process will be reviewed with 3+2 students in HS 360.

*Transfer students should contact the Program Director, John C. Roberts, Jr., EdD, ATC for questions at 304-384-6346.

Graduate Athletic Training Program Admission Requirements
  • Acceptance into the Concord University Graduate School
  • Submissions of completed Graduate Athletic Training Program Application through ATCAS a. Files will be reviewed on a rolling basis beginning December 1 with a final deadline for submission no later than April 1 for subsequent summer admission
  • Must have earned a minimum of 90 semester hours prior to acceptance, or a bachelor’s degree, including a minimum grade of C or higher in all prerequisite course (or equivalent courses for transfer students):
  • A minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 2.75 5. Satisfactory completion of an interview with the Graduate ATP faculty and personnel
Programmatic Related Fees and Costs
Required Cost
CPR Professional Rescuer Certification $35 Required prior to ATP acceptance
$35 renew during second year
Tuition, Fees, Room and Board http://www.concord.edu/Financial-Aid/Tuition-Fees.aspx
Graduate ATP Application through ATCAS Up to $85
Graduate School Application $35 for transfer students (waiver for 3+2 students)
Castle Branch background Check for MSAT Application $45
TB (Tuberculosis) Test Cost dependent on individual's health care coverage
NATA Student-Member Dues $78 per year
ATrack Subscription $90 for lifetime subscription
Gas Cost for Transportation to Clinical Sites Variable costs, carpooling encouraged, transit bus available
Textbooks Approximately $200-$300 per semester (recommend retaining for subsequent semesters)
 
Highly Recommended Cost
Hepatitis B Vaccination (3-shot series) Cost dependent on individual's health care coverage
BOC Certification Examination $300 (spring senior year or within 6 months of graduation)
State Convention Attendance Approximately $40 plus hotel
(annual spring attendance - CATSA assists with funds)
 
Optional Fees Cost
AT Club Membership Dues $20 initial membership
$5 per semester after initial membership
AT Clothing $40 per year (approximately)
Mid-Atlantic Convention Attendance Approximately $90 plus hotel
(annual summer/mid-May)
NATA Convention Attendance Approximately $100 plus hotel
(annual summer/mid-June)
ACES BOC Preparatory Workshop Approximately $195 plus hotel
(2nd year of Master's program)

 
Clinical Education
Clinical Education is a required component of the MSAT. All students enrolled in the Graduate ATP will complete clinical education rotations and assignments over a minimum of two years. Clinical Education experiences are completed both on-campus with the CU Sports Medicine Staff and athletic teams and the staff of the Student Health Center and off-campus at other approved affiliated sites with trained preceptors. Students are responsible for ensuring their own transportation and all related costs to attend on-campus and off-campus clinical experiences.

AT 560: Athletic Training Practicum and Seminar I and AT 665: Athletic Training Practicum and Seminar IV occur, respectively, during the first and second year of the graduate program. These courses are hybrid in nature beginning solely online with programmatic orientation information during the second four-week summer session and end with approximately ten days of in-person bootcamp-style training for skills development, simulation rehearsal, and pre-season screenings for live patients. The in-person portion of AT 560 is more focused on early skills introduction and development related to Information such as taking a medical history and documentation, vital signs, palpation, setting patient goals, first aid, and taping, padding and wrapping to enable first-year students to be more involved during clinical experiences in the initial weeks of the subsequent fall semester. Students in AT 560 also complete clinical experiences under a preceptor by assisting with pre-season screening during the 10-day bootcamp. AT 665 is more focused on advanced skills and enabling the second-year students to mentor first-year students. Additionally, second-year students participate in more comprehensive pre-season clinical experiences with athletic teams while under the supervision of a preceptor.

The fall and spring of the first year include AT 561: Athletic Training Practicum and Seminar II and AT 562: Athletic Training Practicum and Seminar III which include traditional practicums where students are required to complete clinical experiences with trained preceptors in athletic training settings. These two courses last the duration of the semester with the exception of exam week. Fall and spring practicums include proficiency skills demonstrations to assess skills and knowledge presented in the preceding semester coursework and encourage learning over time as students progress toward mastery. The seminar portions of these courses are when the cohort meets as a group. Seminar meetings include simulation and supplemental skills and rehearsal related to themes identified for each practicum.

AT 667: Athletic Training Practicum and Seminar V and AT 668: Athletic Training Practicum and Seminar VI follow the same design at the first year practicum and seminar courses, but only last the first 8-weeks of each semester to enable second-year students to participate in clinical immersions the second half of the semester.

Students will complete AT 663: Interprofessional Practicum and AT 664: Interprofessional Practicum II during the summer terms of the second year. These clinical experiences will be four-week experiences at off-site locations under the supervision of trained preceptors who are non-athletic training health care professionals to encourage interprofessional collaboration to enhance patient care. There are no proficiencies, themes, or new content associated with these experiences, but students are required to report their experiences and engage in regular cohort discussions.

AT 650: Clinical Immersion I and 651: Clinical Immersion II will occur second eight-weeks of the fall and spring semesters, respectively, during the second year. No other courses will be taught during these immersive experiences so students may engage in a full-time clinical atmosphere.
Curriculum

3+2 BSHS & MSAT

Undergraduate Major: Health Sciences

Undergraduate Emphasis: Pre-Athletic Training

Graduate Program: Master of Science in Athletic Training

 
Freshman Year - Fall Semester

CR

HR

Freshman Year - Spring Semester

CR

HR

HS 111: Prevention & Care of Common Injuries 2 Hs 221: Intro to Athletic Training 2
Gen Ed (Category E): BIOL 121/121L
or BIOL 101/101L: Human Body
4 Gen Ed (Category D): PSYC 101 3
Gen Ed (Category A): ENGL 101 3 MATH 104 3
Gen Ed (Category C): Fine Arts 3 Gen Ed (Category A): ENG 102 3
Gen Ed (Category F): MATH 103 3 Gen Ed (Category A): COMM 101 3
UNIV 100 for Pre-Athletic Training Students 1    
Semester Total:  16 Semester Total:  14
 
Sophomore Year - Fall Semester

CR

HR

Sophomore Year - Spring Semester

CR

HR

HS 112: Acute Care of Athletic Injuries Lab 1 BIOL 336/336L: Human Anatomy &
Physiology II & Lab
4
BIOL 335/335L: Human Anatomy &
Physiology I & Lab
4 Gen Ed (Category G): HED 304: Principles of
Nutrition and Weight Loss
2
Gen Ed (Category E): CHEM 101 3 MATH 105: Elementary Statistics 3
Gen Ed (Category E): CHEM 111 1 Gen Ed (Category B): Literature 3
BIOL 249: Medical Terminology 3 Gen Ed (Category D): Social & Behavioral
Science
3
PSY 229: Health Psychology 3    
Semester Total:  15 Semester Total:  15
 
Junior Year - Fall Semester

CR

HR

Junior Year - Spring Semester

CR

HR

EXSS 314: Exercise Physiology 3 EXSS 315: Kinesiology/Biomechanics 3
EXSS 314L: Exercise Testing
and Prescription
1 HED 415: Community Health & Health
Promotion
2
PHYS 101/101L: Introctory Physics & Lab
or PHYS 201/201L: University Physics with
Calculus Part I & Lab
4 HS 360: Observation Practicum in Athletic
Training
1
HS 301: Public Health Epidemiology 3 EXSS 410: Strength & Conditioning
or HS 403: EMT Certification
3
HS 201: Emergency Care (5-wksessions) 1 Gen Ed (Category B): History/Philosophy 3
EXSS 316: Anatomy for Health Care &
Orthopedics
3 Gen Ed (Category D): SOC 101 3
Semester Total:  15 Semester Total:  15


Estimate 90 undergraduate credits.

The graduate program may be completed as a stand-alone degree for students wishing to apply from another institution or completing another undergraduate degree (see list of pre-requisites).

Masters Year 1
 
Masters Summer I

CR

HR

Masters Summer II

CR

HR

AT 570 Evidence-Based Practice & Research
in Healthcare I
1 AT 571: Evidence-Based Practice &
Research in Healthcare II
1
AT 520: Position Statements & Trends in AT I 2 AT 521: Position Statements & Trends in AT II 2
   

AT 560: AT Practicum & Seminar I
(Pre-season Bootcamp)

1
Semester Total:  3 Semester Total:  4
 
Masters Fall I

CR

HR

Masters Spring I

CR

HR

AT 561: AT Practicum & Seminar II (200 hrs) 3 AT 562: AT Practicum & Seminar III (200 hrs) 3
AT 501: Evaluation of Head, Nec, Trunk, & Spine 3 AT 503: Upper Extremity Evaluation 4
AT 501L: Evaluation of Head, Nexk, Trunk & Spine Lab 0 AT 503L: Upper Extremity Evaluation Lab 0
AT 502: Lower Extremity Evaluation 4 AT 504: General Medical, Pharmacological, & Radiological Concerns in AT I 3
AT 502L: Lower Extremity Evaluation Lab 0 AT 504L: General Medical, Pharmacological, & Radiological Concerns in AT I Lab 0
AT 511: Therapeutic Modalities I 3 AT 512: Therapeutic Modalities II 3
AT 511L: Therapeutic Modalities Lab I 0 AT 512: Therapeutic Modalities Lab II 0
    AT 513: Therapeutic Exercise & Rehabilitation I 4
    AT 513L: Therapeutic Exercise & Rehabilitation I Lab 0
AT 640: Lab Assistant Elective   AT 640: Lab Assistant Elective 0
Semester Total:  13 Semester Total:  17


BHS is awarded after first 30 graduate credits are completed (or 120 overall credits are earned between undergraduate and graduate classified courses).

Masters Year 2
 
 
Masters Summer III

CR

HR

Masters Summer IV

CR

HR

AT 614: Psychological, Social, & Diversity
Concerns in AT
2 AT 606: Organization & Admin in AT 2
AT 663: Interprofessional Practicim I 
(Ortho/Surgery)
1 AT 664: Interprofessional Practicum II
(PT/Gen Med)
1
   

AT 665: AT Practicum & Seminar IV
(Pre-season Bootcamp)

1
Semester Total:  3 Semester Total:  4
 
Masters Fall II

CR

HR

Masters Spring II

CR

HR

AT 667: AT Practicum & Seminar V (1st 8 wks - 100hrs) 2 AT 668: Practicum & Seminar VI
(1st 8 wks - 100 hrs)
2
AT 615: Therapeutic Exercise & Rehabilitation II (1st 8 wks) 4 AT 622: Special Topics in AT (1st 8 wks) 2
AT 615L: Therapeutic Exercise & Rehabilitation II Lab (1st 8 wks) 0 AT 672: Research Capstone Presentation/Publication 1
AT 607: General Medical, Pharmacological, and Radiological Concerns in AT II (1st 8 wks) 3 AT 651: Clinical Immersion II: (2nd 8 wks) 4
AT 607L: General Medical, Pharmacological, and Radiological Concerns in AT II Lab (1st 8 wks) 0    
AT 650: Clinical Immersion I (2nd 8 wks) 4    
AT 640: Lab Assistant Elective   AT 640: Lab Assistant Elective  
Semester Total:  13 Semester Total:  9


90 Undergraduate + 66 Graduate credit = 156 total credits for 3+2 MSAT
MSAT Retention and Graduation Requirements

Minimum Retention Standards
  • Any candidate falling below a 3.0 will be placed on academic probation,
  • Candidates who are placed on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the graduate program
  • Candidates must earn the minimum grade of “C” in all graduate courses to continue matriculation through the program
  • Additionally, a separate requirement of earning a “B” or higher is required for all Athletic Training practicum (AT 560, AT 561, AT 562, AT 665, AT 667, AT 668), immersion (AT 650, AT 651), and inter-professional practicum (AT 663, AT 664) courses

Graduation Requirements

In addition to the programmatic course requirements listed previously, MSAT program completers must meet all of the following criteria:
  •  A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 within the graduate program
  • Complete all of the 66 required credit hours as described in the MSAT Audit Sheet
  • Achieve a minimum letter grade of “B” or higher in all Athletic Training practicum, immersion, and inter-professional practicum courses
  • Achieve a minimum letter grade of "C" or higher in all other Athletic Training curricular requirements
  • Completion of Professional Experience Requirements (PER)
  • Completion of MSAT Exit Interview
Apply Now!

0062_Concord-U-2019-05_0135.jpg
 
Concord University is currently accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), 6850 Austin Center Blvd., Suite 100, Austin, TX 78731-3101. The program is currently applying to the CAATE for a change in level of degree and is pending approval.
 
As part of a nationwide mandate, the Athletic Training Program at Concord is seeking accreditation for the Master’s degree and is in the process of teaching out the accredited undergraduate program. Students will no longer be permitted to enter into the undergraduate ATP after the fall 2021 semester. Students after this point should consider the 3+2 Bachelor of Science in Health Science (Pre-Athletic Training Emphasis) and Master of Science in Athletic Training.